Pat H. Broeske ~ Phbauth@aol.com ~ (714) 543-6690

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A Real-Life Hollywood Murder ~ Articles

BookPage/Web Exclusive, October 14, 2014
The baffling 1922 murder of director William Desmond Taylor gets true-crime treatment in Tinseltown, a compelling interweaving of star power, the machinations of power brokers and the desperation of the wannabes and the washed up. Together they provide the book’s apt subtitle: “Murder, Morphine, and Madness at the Dawn of Hollywood.”

On A Tragic Anniversary, Remembering JFK ~ Articles

BookPage, November 2013
Fifty years after gunshots rang out in Dallas’ Dealey Plaza, the collective memory continues to celebrate the life and achievements of John F. Kennedy, and to ponder his death. Authors and publishers are also remembering the November 22nd anniversary with dozens of new books on Kennedy’s assassination and legacy. We’ve poured through the stacks to point readers toward some of the best.

Teen Idols ~ Articles

Encyclopedia of Popular Culture (2000)

As long as there are teenagers, there will be teen idols. From the vintage “Frankie” Sinatra to Elvis Presley, from the Beatles to David Cassidy, from the New Kids on the Block to ‘N Sync, the names and faces may change with the decades, but the emotions that drive the phenomenon do not. Teen idols are a rite of passage for pre-teens and early teens. They are dream mates who fuel romantic daydreams, and provide a safe release for hormonally-charged emotions. After all, unlike flesh-and-blood boyfriends and girlfriends, the teen idols make no demands.

Leni Riefenstahl ~ Articles

BookPage, March 2007

A woman who played a commanding role in one of history’s darkest chapters, Leni Riefenstahl—Hitler’s favorite filmmaker—went on to deftly rewrite her own history. But lies have a way of catching up with liars. In a pair of new biographies, Riefenstahl, perhaps the single most controversial filmmaker who ever lived, has been found out.

John Garfield ~ Articles

Encyclopedia of Popular Culture (2000)

The original movie rebel, ruggedly handsome John Garfield rose to fame with his post-Depression portrayals of cynical men who reflected the era’s social unrest. As depicted by Garfield, characters no longer were readily identifiable as either good or evil—the rebel characterization which became the calling card of iconoclastic actors including Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, James Dean, Steve McQueen, and Al Pacino. Garfield also endures as a strong sexual presence, particularly in his teamings with Lana Turner in the 1946 adaptation of James M. Cain’s steamy “The Postman Always Rings Twice,” and, a year later, opposite Joan Crawford in “Humoresque.”