Pat H. Broeske ~ Phbauth@aol.com ~ (714) 543-6690

work

The Black Dahlia ~ Articles

The New York Times, February 5, 2006

During her brief lifetime, Elizabeth Short never starred in a single movie. There is no record of her having played so much as a bit part. Yet within popular culture, Short — who frequently told friends she wanted to break into show business — has emerged as something of an honorary leading lady whose shadowy life and violent death follow the contours of a classic film noir script.

A Voice Twice Silenced: Tim and Jeff Buckley ~ Articles

Orange Coast, September 2012

Since Jeff’s death, his music has been named to assorted critics’ best lists. There have been biographies and articles and numerous documentaries—and, as a result, the posthumous spotlight has found his father, who was previously eclipsed by psychedelic, in-your-face ’60s acts. Tim also is the subject of several biographical books and a slew of print appreciations. His music is being rediscovered.

A Colossal Conservation Project ~ Articles

American Archaeology, Summer 2012

In a city renowned for reinvention, where non-indigenous palm trees dot the landscape and cosmetic surgeons are as ubiquitous as freeways, the priceless collection of a landmark museum is getting a makeover. Packed away for decades, the artifacts at the Southwest Museum of the American Indian—Los Angeles’ oldest museum—are seeing the light (as much as is museum-safe), in an ambitious conservation and rehousing effort.

Mind Field: Homeland and Bipolar Disorder ~ Articles

Emmy, No. 3, 2012

Damaged protagonists are a TV cliché, but there is nothing formulaic about Carrie Mathison of Showtime’s “Homeland.” Played with compelling edginess by Claire Danes, this senior CIA officer is caught up in a complicated scenario involving a perceived terrorist threat and a former American POW she believes to be a spy. But Carrie has a secret of her own: bipolar disorder.

Kids Role Models ~ Articles

Family Circle, May 18, 2004

Once upon a time kids looked up to public figures like President John F. Kennedy and Dr. Martin Luther King. Today’s potential role models are more likely to include pouty pop tarts, bad boy rappers and the latest athlete to have a run-in with the law.